Strike a pose with the Range Rover Evoque

The second generation Range Rover Evoque is a stylish SUV that has been tailored to fit into our modern lifestyles. The interior has been refreshed and now includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard and the exterior has been smoothed so that the Evoque has a sleek silhouette.

I drove the 20MY P250 R-Dynamic S, which has a 2.0 litre petrol engine that produces 183kW and 365Nm and it will do 0-100km/h in a respectable 7.5 seconds for a SUV that weighs more than 1,800kg. It did suffer from a bit of turbo lag, but when the power kicks in it goes well enough to keep you satisfied. The official combined fuel consumption is 8.1L/100km and for my week I used 11.3L/100km, which is similar the Jaguar E-PACE I have previously driven with the same engine.

The all-wheel drive Evoque comes with a Terrain Response 2 as standard and it has comfortable, quiet and solid feeling ride. You have five drive modes to choose from including Eco, Comfort, Snow, Mud Ruts and Sand. Some of the smart 4×4 features include low traction launch, vehicle angle and a compass with altitude. But let’s be honest when your Evoque is fitted with 20” wheels like those on my press car ($2,440 option) it’s highly unlikely this SUV is going to see anything more challenging than a gravel driveway, but it’s heritage suggests that it could handle the rough stuff if required.

As soon as you step into the cabin you will appreciate the smell and feel of the leather, but the light colour leather in my Evoque was already showing signs of marking. The front seats are comfortable and have ten way power adjustments, but no memory settings. The front seats are also heated ($620 option) as is the steering wheel ($690 option). The cabin has a light and airy feel thanks to the optional fixed panoramic sunroof ($2,040), but this does reduce your headroom.

Another area where wear would be a concern in the long-term would be the carpet under the driver’s feet because the floor mat is small and doesn’t cover the entire floor properly and this would also be an issue of you got into the Evoque with muddy shoes.  

My Evoque had the Touch Pro Duo system, two 10” high-definition touchscreens that added to the suave feel of the cabin. The bottom screen displays drive mode selection and climate settings. While the top screen, which has an adjustable angle, displays the sat nav, media options and standard reversing camera with 360o sensors. You also get voice control that works well for making calls, but you cannot set sat nav destination using it as this feature is not available on Australian models.

Under the arm rest there are two USB ports, one micro sim and one 12V outlet. In front of the arm rest is a removable cover that goes over the cup holders. The cover is a nice touch, but a little more thought was needed on where to place it when you want to use the cup holders. Because when you remove it and place it in the cubby under the arm rest it takes up a lot of room and if you put in door pocket it can rattle.

The rear seats have enough leg and head room for two adults thanks to a 20mm longer wheelbase of the second generation Evoque. It has two ISOFIX/three rear tether child seat restraint points, but in reality you would only fit two child seats in. Then the centre seat arm rest can be folded down and this has two drink holders. There are also storage cubbies in the rear doors big enough to stow a large drink bottle. Rear passengers only get vents in the centre with air speed adjustment and one 12V outlet.

There is not great vision out the back of the Evoque, especially with car seats fitted. But my SUV was fitted with the smart rear view camera ($515 option) that displays a wide angle view in the rear view mirror from a camera mounted on the roof in the antenna. This camera even dims the headlights of cars that shine in the rear view mirror.

The boot is a reasonable size for weekly shop and a stroller and accessed by a powered boot lid ($480 option). It has four tie down points, one 12V outlet and a space saver spare tyre.

The Evoque was fitted the Jaguar Land Rover ten ambient light colours ($410 option). Something else which is an option, but really should come as standard on a SUV of this value is keyless entry and push button start ($900 option).

The lane keep assist comes as standard and works OK, but can be a bit aggressive and is not linear in its operation. My Evoque also had blind spot assist, adaptive cruise control and high speed emergency braking (this is the optional Drive Pack $1,340). Plus you can option head-up display ($1,300 option) and this can be adjusted for brightness, position and content.

All Evoque model variants built after December 2018 onwards have a 5-star ANCAP safety rating and include dual front, side chest-protecting and side head-protecting (curtain) airbags as standard. The ANCAP testing incudes a rating for adult occupant protection of 36 out of 38 or 94% and for child occupant protection 43.7 out of 49 or 89%.

All new Range Rovers come with a three years/100,000 km warranty and you get 24/7 roadside assistance for the period of your warranty also. For service cost peace of mind you can purchase a service plan for the Evoque for $1,750 that covers standard service costs for five years/130,000km.

The Range Rover Evoque P250 R-Dynamic S is a smart looking SUV with a high level of luxury on offer. The number of model variants within the Evoque range has been reduced, but there is still room for confusion, especially if you factor in options. Prices for this particular variant start at $69,820 plus on-road costs and as tested my Evoque was $88,435 plus on-roads. Visit you preferred Land Rover retailer to explore the Evoque range for yourself.

Pros Cons
It’s a stylish SUV Keyless entry and keyless go does not come standard
Increased room for rear passengers over previous model Only a three year warranty, many car companies are moving to four years and beyond
The smart rear view mirror Light-coloured leather shows marks

Photographs by Driven Women Magazine.